MONOFILAMENT LINE

line sizes

I’ve mentioned elsewhere the story of the father and son duo I took out on the boat some years ago. The boy was maybe twelve years old, and obsessed with all things fishing. He watched all the TV shows, read all the magazines, and bought all the DVDs. Nice kid. But he didn’t have a lot of actual experience on the water. So as we headed out chasing kingfish that day I took a look at his rod and reel and realized it left a lot to be desired. His father, on his behalf, refused my suggestion of using one of the spare boat outfits, saying the lad had always wanted to catch something on the tackle he got, for Christmas. It all ended in tears when he hooked up a kingfish and the combination of sticky drag and crap line meant he got pinged. And when I say in tears, I mean that literally. The young fellow was crying.

 

I didn’t want to say much about it at the time.  But when we got back to the boat ramp and they were unloading their gear, there was an opportunity to check out the reel. Would you believe that the line on the spool was faded more on one side, than on the other? With a bit of diplomatic questioning I asked Dad how that happened. Turns out that, whenever they came back from fishing, he would prop the rod up in the same place, against the garage wall. Every time. And the afternoon sun had cooked the line on one side of the reel – which I guess showed how long it had been, since they’d last gone fishing.

 

Now that’s an extreme case, probably the worst I’ve seen. But only the worst by degree, because it happens to all of us. Every time you’re out on the water the sun is attacking your line. As you wind wet line onto your spool it dries out, meaning salt crystal deposits. Too small to see but they are there, and doing damage. For blokes who can’t get out fishing as often as they would like – which is pretty much all of us - it’s crucial to have your tackle in tip top condition, in case Mister Big comes along.

 

The line is what connects you to the fish, so it’s hard to imagine a more important tackle component. Removing the old line and replacing with new used to be a bit of a pain but now is just so easy. Drop your rod in the rod holder, run the line through the guides, back off the drag. Attach an old Coke bottle to your power drill and wrap the line around it. You can strip a reel in maybe a minute using this method. Pull the bottle of your drill and dump the whole lot in the bin. Then respool with fresh line.

 

 

As with most of our tackle we buy monofilament from large factories with big brand clients, To keep the price down we ask those factories to add our order to their production runs but of course, with no branding. That means a big saving, which we pass onto you.

 

Here’s our pricing:

 

2000m 0.65mm 50-pound breaking strain clear monofilament line:

$60, including delivery anywhere in Australia.

 

1000m 80-pound breaking strain clear monofilament line:

$60, including delivery anywhere in Australia.

 

And here’s competition pricing from Australia’s biggest tackle store chain, BCF:

 

 

Ours is less than half their price.

 

That’s important because if line costs too much

there’s a natural tendency to not replace it as often as you should.

 

Try an order?

You won’t be disappointed.

 

But if you need a sample, drop me a note using the contact page.

 

Thanks for reading,

Andrew

line sizes

VISIT US on ...

GET FREE SAMPLES

I’ve mentioned elsewhere the story of the father and son duo I took out on the boat some years ago. The boy was maybe twelve years old, and obsessed with all things fishing. He watched all the TV shows, read all the magazines, and bought all the DVDs. Nice kid. But he didn’t have a lot of actual experience on the water. So as we headed out chasing kingfish that day I took a look at his rod and reel and realized it left a lot to be desired. His father, on his behalf, refused my suggestion of using one of the spare boat outfits, saying the lad had always wanted to catch something on the tackle he got, for Christmas. It all ended in tears when he hooked up a kingfish and the combination of sticky drag and crap line meant he got pinged. And when I say in tears, I mean that literally. The young fellow was crying.

 

I didn’t want to say much about it at the time.  But when we got back to the boat ramp and they were unloading their gear, there was an opportunity to check out the reel. Would you believe that the line on the spool was faded more on one side, than on the other? With a bit of diplomatic questioning I asked Dad how that happened. Turns out that, whenever they came back from fishing, he would prop the rod up in the same place, against the garage wall. Every time. And the afternoon sun had cooked the line on one side of the reel – which I guess showed how long it had been, since they’d last gone fishing.

 

Now that’s an extreme case, probably the worst I’ve seen. But only the worst by degree, because it happens to all of us. Every time you’re out on the water the sun is attacking your line. As you wind wet line onto your spool it dries out, meaning salt crystal deposits. Too small to see but they are there, and doing damage. For blokes who can’t get out fishing as often as they would like – which is pretty much all of us - it’s crucial to have your tackle in tip top condition, in case Mister Big comes along.

 

The line is what connects you to the fish, so it’s hard to imagine a more important tackle component. Removing the old line and replacing with new used to be a bit of a pain but now is just so easy. Drop your rod in the rod holder, run the line through the guides, back off the drag. Attach an old Coke bottle to your power drill and wrap the line around it. You can strip a reel in maybe a minute using this method. Pull the bottle of your drill and dump the whole lot in the bin. Then respool with fresh line.

 

 

As with most of our tackle we buy monofilament from large factories with big brand clients, To keep the price down we ask those factories to add our order to their production runs but of course, with no branding. That means a big saving, which we pass onto you.

 

Here’s our pricing:

 

2000m 0.65mm 50-pound breaking strain clear monofilament line:

$60, including delivery anywhere in Australia.

 

1000m 80-pound breaking strain clear monofilament line:

$60, including delivery anywhere in Australia.

 

And here’s competition pricing from Australia’s biggest tackle store chain, BCF:

 

 

Ours is less than half their price.

 

That’s important because if line costs too much

there’s a natural tendency to not replace it as often as you should.

 

Try an order?

You won’t be disappointed.

 

But if you need a sample, drop me a note using the contact page.

 

Thanks for reading,

Andrew